Last edited by Mezizuru
Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

1 edition of The wheat stem sawfly and its control found in the catalog.

The wheat stem sawfly and its control

by United States. Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

  • 177 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Agricultural Research Administration, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in [S.l.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Control,
  • Black grain-stem sawfly,
  • Wheat,
  • Cephus cinctus,
  • Diseases and pests

  • Edition Notes

    StatementBureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Agricultural Research Administration, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
    ContributionsDavis, E. G., Callenbach, J. A., Munro, J. A.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination10 p. ;
    Number of Pages10
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25665135M
    OCLC/WorldCa30380851

    Wheat fly (German: Weizengallmücke) is the name given in Europe to the Contarinia (formerly Diplosis or Mayetiola) tritici (Kirby), a small dipterous insect of the family of gall gnats, from its depredations on wheat, to which it is nearly as destructive as the famous and closely allied species, the Hessian is typical for agricultural pests, the species is known by a number of common. Figure Telia of wheat stem rust overwintering on stubble and plant residue. Figure Stem rust pustules develop on infected plant parts including leaf sheaths, stems, spikes, and occasionally leaves as well. Figure (a) Stem rust pustules. Disease Cycle. The stem rust fungus requires two hosts to complete its life cycle.

    Wheat stem sawfly can cause a lot of damage to a wheat yield, and there aren’t a lot of options to control it. Enter: Bracon sephi, an orange wasp that is less than a quarter inch long. The way that this small wasp attacks wheat stem sawfly sounds like something out of science fiction, but in this episode of the Pests & Predators podcast, Scott Meers from Mayland Consulting, is here to say. Summary: Wheat is an integral part of dryland production agriculture in the High Plains; not just for its yield, but also for its residue which can trap soil moisture and conserve soil. The wheat stem sawfly currently is one of the most important pests of wheat in the central and northern High Plains of .

      Montana State University's College of Agriculture faculty David Weaver observes wheat variations for wheat stem sawfly cutting at a study plot near Amsterdam, Mont., Friday, Sept. 13, The wheat stem sawfly is a severe pest of wheat production in the northern Great Plains, with current management based only on the adoption of solid-stem varieties that offer partial resistance to the pest. New management tools are urgently needed to implement integrated pest management of the wheat stem sawfly. This project examines using the environmentally friendly integration of natural.


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The wheat stem sawfly and its control by United States. Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Wheat Stem Sawfly (Hymenoptera: Cephidae) and its Natural Enemies: Distribution and Impact By: Thomas Shanower (Entomologist) Download this Poster (PDF: KB) The wheat stem sawfly, Cephus cinctus, has been a pest of wheat in the northern Great Plains since the late s. Yield losses in Montana alone exceed $25 million annually.

LINCOLN — Wheat stem sawfly (WSS) has been a very significant pest of wheat in the northern wheat-producing regions of our country such as Montana and North Dakota and well into Canada. Larvae cut and weaken the stems of maturing wheat causing the wheat to lodge creating very significant harvest losses in many situations.

Abstract. For more than yrs, the wheat stem sawfly (WSS) Cephus cinctus Norton (Hymenoptera: Cephidae), has been a destructive pest of cereal crops in the Northern Great Plains.

WSS infestation levels >70% have been reported, and economic loss from crop damage caused by this insect can be as high as $80 million (USD) per year in the state of Montana alone. The wheat stem sawfly is the most destructive pest in wheat production in Montana.

Annual losses are estimated at $25 - 30 million. This study is designed to develop, implement and evaluate management tactics against the wheat stem sawfly. The purpose is to reduce crop losses caused by insect pests in wheat. There is no chemical control of this pest - management hinges on a combination of resistant varieties, cultural controls, and biological control.

Please refer to the recent KSRE publication MF Wheat Stem Sawfly for detailed information on its life history, biology and management. Page created 11/01/ by J.P. Michaud. The wheat stem sawfly, long considered a severe pest of wheat in Montana and North Dakota, was found infesting wheat along Highway 14 in Weld County in and again in Colorado wheat growers should familiarize themselves with the sawfly’s life cycle, damage and available management options.

The sawfly will not damage corn or broadleaf crops. Other cereal crops (barley, oats, rye) are not adequate hosts for the wheat stem sawfly to complete its development, even though eggs may be laid in the stems of these grasses. Management Cultural Controls. Tillage will reduce wheat stem sawfly larval survival through the winter and spring.

More Information. See Wheat Stem Sawfly in Wheat, a webinar on the Plant Management Network by Jeff addresses the insect's life cycle, geographic range, host range, how it causes damage, and control options.

For management recommendations see: Cultural Management Options for Wheat Stem Sawfly in CropWatch. Also search for wheat stem sawfly on. While an average of about 2% of the sawfly population could complete its development on Warhorse, some hollow stem varieties saw % survival of sawflies, although they were typically 50%.

Solid stem wheat may have an advantage outside of sawfly control. Its common name, "sawfly", derives from the saw-like ovipositor that is used for egg-laying, in which a female makes a slit in either a stem or plant leaf to deposit the eggs.

The first known use of this name was in Sawflies are also known as "wood-wasps". Phylogeny. Unfortunately, our main line of defense for CWRS wheat, solid stem genetics, was lost when Lillian was moved to the CNHR class. CDC Adamant is currently registered as a semi-solid stem with resistance to wheat stem sawfly but I’ve heard limited feedback on its control performance.

This leaves growers in those areas of concern at risk. The wheat stem sawfly (WSS) is a native stem-mining insect pest of economic importance within the Great Plains. During the agricultural revolution of the late s in the Northern Great Plains, the native WSS transitioned from infesting only large hollow-stemmed wheatgrasses to infesting the introduced cultivated spring wheat fields.

Since efforts to control the wheat stem sawfly are more likely to target particular stages than particular age classes, we present the stage-specific, rather than age-specific, elasticities.

Following the approach of Mills (, and personal communication), we calculated the percentage reduction in stage-specific survival necessary to prevent. Research is pointing to several management steps that winter wheat farmers can take to help control sawfly populations.

At left, an on-farm research study near Gurley is comparing wheat stem sawfly emergence from wheat stubble under three treatments - a no-till control, one tandem disk pass, and two tandem disk passes.

The wheat stem sawfly, Cephus cinctus Norton (Hymenoptera: Cephidae), is historically one of the most important economic insect pests in the northern Great Plains of North America. Within this geographical region, the areas subjected to greatest attack are southern Alberta and Saskatchewan, southwestern Manitoba, eastern and northern Montana, North Dakota, northern South Dakota, and western.

The Wheat Stem Sawfly as a Pest of Wheat The wheat stem sawfly, Cephus cinctus Norton (Hymenoptera: Cephidae) (WSS) is historically a pest of major economic importance in wheat, Triticum aestivum L., in the Northern Great Plains of North America.

Early records indicate that the WSS originally. Figure 1. distribution of the wheat stem sawfly, from survey conducted by Colorado State University.

The wheat stem sawfly is a small wasp, about half of an inch long. It has a black body with three broad transverse yellow bands on the on the abdomen.

It’s wings are a dark translucent color. The sawfly survey was discontinued in ; however, data from the survey are being used strategically for grassland and on-farm evaluation of sawfly-parasitoid relationships.

Extension is conducting a survey and landscape analysis to better understand the ecology of both the wheat stem sawfly and its parasitoid in Nebraska. Wheat stem sawfly infestations impact harvest LINCOLN — Wheat stem sawfly (WSS) has been a very significant pest of wheat in the northern wheat-producing.

Skip to content. J US Consumer Confidence Slides In July As Hope Plunges OUT OF CONTROL. crops. Alternatively, some researchers have suggested that the wheat stem sawfly may have been introduced into North America inadvertently from northeastern Asia. Whatever its origins, wheat stem sawfly is the most serious insect pest of spring wheat and durum wheat in North Dakota.

From to the mids the sawfly again became a problem with as much as 50 percent crop loss reported in northwestern North Dakota. Through cultural control practices, wheat stem sawfly damage has been held to a minimum in North Dakota from the mids to date.

However, each year the sawfly takes its toll, primarily in western North Dakota.The wheat stem sawfly used to be an exclusive pest of spring wheat. However, in recent years changes in its seasonality have allowed it to attack winter wheat as well.

It wasn’t until the s that this insect threatened wheat production in western Nebraska. Although it has been known to infest wheat fields primarily in Scotts Bluff, Banner. It’s important to note its presence and numbers; however, insecticide will NOT control wheat stem sawfly.

Research (see Table 1) conducted in during high populations of wheat stem sawfly found that a foliar-applied insecticide (Warrior, lambda-cyhalothrin, pyrethroid insecticide) at the leaf or the flag leaf stages were not.